The Galactic Core
So this happened yesterday. Best game I’ve ever been to. 

So this happened yesterday. Best game I’ve ever been to. 

Started watching ‘Attack On Titan’ last night

paradoxtheory:

Shit’s intense yo, it also has a kickass theme tune

It’s not just kickass, it’s an absolute banger. That guitar

uglysoulsbeautifulbodies:

paradoxtheory:

uglysoulsbeautifulbodies:

paradoxtheory:

paradoxtheory:

uglysoulsbeautifulbodies:

DO NOT DISMISS A SOMETHING A CHILD IS PROUD OF. LOOK AT IT. POINT SOMETHING OUT AND TELL THEM YOU LOVE IT. IF A CHILD DRAWS YOU A RAINBOW, TELL THEM YOU LOVE HOW IT HAS RED. THEY WILL THINK “WOW. IT DOES HAVE RED. THEY LOVE HOW I PUT RED IN IT….

Maybe your parents should have told you that it’s ok to have a different opinion to someone else, I’m guessing that was a lesson you missed out on.

I should probably expand on my original point.

Making a big deal over something that is average is probably the best way to go for a really young kid, who just wants acceptance and to be told that they’re good and Mommy and Daddy think they’re special. That’s fine.

But when the kids are older, say 12/13? I don’t think, in my opinion, that faking pride over something mediocre is particularly helpful, because there’s a chance that the kid will ‘settle’ at a point where it’s easy to achieve the bare minimum just to please their parents. It’s hard to explain I guess?

I just know that if my parents would have feigned pride when I got a Level 6 in English in Year 9, which is the definition of average, I wouldn’t have then gone on to achieve much higher than expected at GCSE Level, because I wouldn’t have had anything to aim for.

My parents knew I could do better, they told me so, so I pushed myself to the best test scores in my entire year group, without sacrificing my social time or anything

Well, personally I have children in my life who are 3 and under and i made this post when I was upset. if a child is drawing pictures of rainbows and getting excited about the red you noticed they are probably not over 12 years old. I have taken multiple classes on child care and such and a lot of it focuses on the developing years, because they’re so important. So many parents just brush off things their child is proud of and that is not okay. I think we should be taking time to let them know they are special. I know so many people like to talk about how none of us are special little snowflakes and we are all average but it’s just not true. I think everyone is special and especially children need to know that. The way their faces look when you tell them you’re proud is so precious. And the point of pointing something specific out is that a lot of parents just say “yea that’s great” and barely look at it. When all you need to do is look at them and say “i love the red” and they will be so proud of themselves.

I do know what you’re getting at so I’ll apologise for my original bit of sarcasm.

I totally agree with your point with regards to the younger children needing to be told that they are special and that they’re doing good things, I used to do it with my sister.

But obviously as she’s getting older I’ve told her to kinda concentrate her focus onto the things she both enjoys and is good at because I’m brutally honest with her when she needs it. I think it gets to a certain point in life where lying to spare feelings can do more harm than good.

It does feel horrible sometimes but I think without someone to help you focus on the things that you’re good at, you kinda get lost in superfluous activity that has no benefit in the long run I guess?

I know what point I’m trying to make anyway, and again I’m sorry for coming across as a bit of a bellend.

I mostly work with younger children so most of my knowledge is with them. As they get older, i treat them more as friends than kids i take care of. (The oldest being 12) Obviously when i help them with their homework, I don’t tell them they’re great if they get a wrong answer. I help them figure it out and help them to do it right next time, then i tell them I’m proud of them for being willing to learn from their mistakes. Literally 3/4 of my heart is love i have for children and so it makes me so upset to see parents neglect (even only slightly) and break their kids. Small children need to much attention and reassurance so I will gladly give it to them. The first time my niece drew people instead of scribbles she was super excited to show my dad that she’d drawn mommy and herself and her sisters. My dad told her they looked nothing like us and barely looked like people. (What a dickhead) and obviously they didn’t look like us and it was a bit hard to see they were people until she pointed it out to us, but she is 3. She was so proud an my dad just shot her down. (As you can probably guess, he did that to my siblings and me too so that’s why I get so angry about it) my dad even embarrassed me about things i was exceptionally good at to the point where even now i don’t like showing people. Even though when I have shown people, they’ve been super impressed and even told me i was the best they’ve ever seen.

See, I don’t really have that much contact with children so it’s not something I do all that often. Although if I’m going to pursue a career in teaching I should probably work on my empathy, but that’s just how I am I guess. 

I can see why you feel like this though, I can imagine it would have been difficult to develop in an environment like that so I can also see why you’re so passionate about what you do, which I think is great. 

I hope that I can find something other than football (soccer) to be passionate about one day, because I’m absolutely shocking at it :’(

I love your accent
Anonymous

Thanks, that’s definitely something I don’t hear every day!

uglysoulsbeautifulbodies:

paradoxtheory:

paradoxtheory:

uglysoulsbeautifulbodies:

DO NOT DISMISS A SOMETHING A CHILD IS PROUD OF. LOOK AT IT. POINT SOMETHING OUT AND TELL THEM YOU LOVE IT. IF A CHILD DRAWS YOU A RAINBOW, TELL THEM YOU LOVE HOW IT HAS RED. THEY WILL THINK “WOW. IT DOES HAVE RED. THEY LOVE HOW I PUT RED IN IT….

Maybe your parents should have told you that it’s ok to have a different opinion to someone else, I’m guessing that was a lesson you missed out on.

I should probably expand on my original point.

Making a big deal over something that is average is probably the best way to go for a really young kid, who just wants acceptance and to be told that they’re good and Mommy and Daddy think they’re special. That’s fine.

But when the kids are older, say 12/13? I don’t think, in my opinion, that faking pride over something mediocre is particularly helpful, because there’s a chance that the kid will ‘settle’ at a point where it’s easy to achieve the bare minimum just to please their parents. It’s hard to explain I guess?

I just know that if my parents would have feigned pride when I got a Level 6 in English in Year 9, which is the definition of average, I wouldn’t have then gone on to achieve much higher than expected at GCSE Level, because I wouldn’t have had anything to aim for.

My parents knew I could do better, they told me so, so I pushed myself to the best test scores in my entire year group, without sacrificing my social time or anything

Well, personally I have children in my life who are 3 and under and i made this post when I was upset. if a child is drawing pictures of rainbows and getting excited about the red you noticed they are probably not over 12 years old. I have taken multiple classes on child care and such and a lot of it focuses on the developing years, because they’re so important. So many parents just brush off things their child is proud of and that is not okay. I think we should be taking time to let them know they are special. I know so many people like to talk about how none of us are special little snowflakes and we are all average but it’s just not true. I think everyone is special and especially children need to know that. The way their faces look when you tell them you’re proud is so precious. And the point of pointing something specific out is that a lot of parents just say “yea that’s great” and barely look at it. When all you need to do is look at them and say “i love the red” and they will be so proud of themselves.

I do know what you’re getting at so I’ll apologise for my original bit of sarcasm.

I totally agree with your point with regards to the younger children needing to be told that they are special and that they’re doing good things, I used to do it with my sister.

But obviously as she’s getting older I’ve told her to kinda concentrate her focus onto the things she both enjoys and is good at because I’m brutally honest with her when she needs it. I think it gets to a certain point in life where lying to spare feelings can do more harm than good.

It does feel horrible sometimes but I think without someone to help you focus on the things that you’re good at, you kinda get lost in superfluous activity that has no benefit in the long run I guess?

I know what point I’m trying to make anyway, and again I’m sorry for coming across as a bit of a bellend.

paradoxtheory:

uglysoulsbeautifulbodies:

DO NOT DISMISS A SOMETHING A CHILD IS PROUD OF. LOOK AT IT. POINT SOMETHING OUT AND TELL THEM YOU LOVE IT. IF A CHILD DRAWS YOU A RAINBOW, TELL THEM YOU LOVE HOW IT HAS RED. THEY WILL THINK “WOW. IT DOES HAVE RED. THEY LOVE HOW I PUT RED IN IT….

Maybe your parents should have told you that it’s ok to have a different opinion to someone else, I’m guessing that was a lesson you missed out on.

I should probably expand on my original point.

Making a big deal over something that is average is probably the best way to go for a really young kid, who just wants acceptance and to be told that they’re good and Mommy and Daddy think they’re special. That’s fine.

But when the kids are older, say 12/13? I don’t think, in my opinion, that faking pride over something mediocre is particularly helpful, because there’s a chance that the kid will ‘settle’ at a point where it’s easy to achieve the bare minimum just to please their parents. It’s hard to explain I guess?

I just know that if my parents would have feigned pride when I got a Level 6 in English in Year 9, which is the definition of average, I wouldn’t have then gone on to achieve much higher than expected at GCSE Level, because I wouldn’t have had anything to aim for.

My parents knew I could do better, they told me so, so I pushed myself to the best test scores in my entire year group, without sacrificing my social time or anything

Started watching ‘Attack On Titan’ last night

Shit’s intense yo, it also has a kickass theme tune

English weather logic

tardis221b:

August 29th

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August 30th

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August 31st

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September 1st

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I’m one of those people who struggles to read out loud because my eyes move faster than I can read

They should put that on the welcome signs. "Welcome to Walsall, a wretched hive of scum and villainy." :P

Yes, they should. It would be a sign befitting of our wonderful town